Predictions

Can dreams predict the future?

Dreams about having cancer…

Dreams about having cancerDream: Lately I’ve had a couple of dreams about having cancer. In the first dream, I had lung cancer. Four days later I had a dream that I had cancer in my legs. Should I be worried?

DreamsMaster: My approach to dreams is to consider the literal meaning first, and then to move on to the symbolism.

If you haven’t visited a doctor in a long time, maybe now is the time. Perhaps you have been noticing some odd sensations in your body that you’ve been ignoring or pushing away to the “back of your mind”, and your dreams are bringing these unconscious concerns to the forefront.

Another possibility is that the dreams could be serving as a warning. For example, if you smoke, the dream could be throwing up a red flag about the danger you’re exposing yourself to.

If a literal interpretation doesn’t fit, next look at the symbolism. If it were my dream, having cancer would symbolize something in my life is threatening to consume my life force. Along these lines, in response to a dream about lung cancer, you might ask yourself, “Where in my life do I feel like I’m unable to breathe freely, or I’m suffocating?” Similarly, dreaming about cancer in one’s legs might also represent a threat to one’s freedom, or the ability to “run away” from some perceived danger.

This is not a dream to be ignored, whether literal or symbolic. Your innermost self is sending you the message that there’s some type of malignant or negative presence threatening your well-being, and it’s up to your waking self to take action.



See also:

Man predicts 2016 Cubs win in a dream…

Published Nov. 4, 2016 on the Huffington Post:

Man Who Predicted Cubs Win In 1993 Yearbook Finally Speaks

As a psychic, Michael Lee is batting 1.000.

Back in 1993, Lee predicted in his yearbook picture that the Chicago Cubs would win the 2016 World Series, adding, “You heard it here first.”

Predicts cubs win in yearbookThe yearbook photo went viral after the Cubs made it to the World Series for the first time since 1945.

But Lee, now a 41-year-old software engineer living in the Chicago suburbs, kept a low profile by design.

“My attitude was, ‘You have to play the games,’” he told The Huffington Post. “I didn’t want to be a distraction. The players shouldn’t be asked about my prediction.”

Ah yes, the prediction. It may have been printed in the yearbook 23 years ago, but Lee said it actually came to him in a dream in 1983.

“I saw the words, ‘Cubs World Champions 2016’ on the Wrigley Field sign and I heard Harry Caray calling home runs,” he said.

Lee may have predicted it, but he actually forgot about it until former classmate Marcos Meza reminded him, according to WGN TV.

“When [Lee and I] connected on Facebook in 2009 I sent him the photo and told him we were nearing 2016. He posted the photo of his prediction on August 8th,” Meza told the station. “After my Dodgers lost it was time for me to make this go viral and BeLEEve in the Cubs for 2016.”

Lee had hoped that the prediction might come true last year when they almost fulfilled a prediction made in 1989’s “Back To The Future II.”

“When it didn’t happen,” he said, “I thought maybe they’ll do it next year.”

Lee tried to put the prediction out of his mind during the games, but had a good feeling during the rain delay during Game 7.

“Going into the 10th inning, I thought this might be good for the Cubs since they were deeper,” he said.

Once the 108-year drought was ended, Lee said his phone practically broke because so many people were calling to congratulate him.

“I’ve never texted so many people at once,” he laughed. “My brothers, Dad and I were happy.”

Lee couldn’t have predicted the media interest in him after his Cubs prediction came true. He’s skeptical that people can predict the future to begin with.

“I think this is really a very extreme coincidence,” he said. “Does it blow my mind? A little.”

Cubs win T-shirtAlthough Lee could rest on his laurels, and possibly never buy another beer in his life thanks to grateful Cubs fans, he’s trying to use his newfound fame for good.

Lee is marketing a line of T-shirts featuring his now-famous yearbook photo and the phrase “You Heard It Here First”

He says he plans to donate proceeds to charities that focus on stomping out bullying.

“They won’t stop it by themselves,” he said, “but it will give funding to defray this activity and maybe quell that behavior.”